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Thought

Compassion for those facing disaster in Pakistan

The floods in Pakistan have been devastating. They began more than two weeks ago in the mountainous north-west of Pakistan and have swept south across a quarter of the country including its agricultural heartland. The monsoon rains continue to fall and have affected 20 million people in an area the size of England.

At least 1500 people have died and diseases like cholera threaten the lives of many more, especially children. People have lost their homes and possessions, their animals and crops and face a very uncertain future. They need food, emergency shelters, medicines and clean water. The long term economic consequences for Pakistan are very serious. This disaster is the latest in a string of disasters this year that have affected millions of people in many parts of the world.

We live on a very beautiful planet which provides a rich abundance of natural resources, enough to provide for everyone. Yet in several ways we are reminded that all is not well. Disasters reveal the massive power of natural forces against which we feel helpless. Human sin and corruption spoil and mar the lives of many and often contribute to the effects of natural disasters.

Disasters are not a sign that the people who experience them are especially sinful. Many who suffer are young children. In the Bible we are told of the experience of Job, a very rich man who lived a righteous life. Yet he suffered great personal tragedy as he lost his crops, animals, home and all his children. In the face of this tragic loss he put his trust in God saying, “Naked I came from my mother’s womb and naked I shall depart. The Lord gave and the Lord has taken away, may the name of the Lord be praised.” In all this Job did not sin by charging God with wrongdoing.

We often strive to understand why such things happen and want to find answers to our questions. The answers are at best tentative and partial. Job experienced something better. God didn’t answer all his questions, but he drew near to Job in his anguish and suffering. God showed him his compassion and mercy so that Job could say, “My ears had heard of you but now my eyes have seen you.” Let us pray that those who are suffering so much today will not only receive the humanitarian aid they so desperately need but will also know the compassion and mercy of God.

Categories
Thought

Good news in a world of trouble

Many of us are addicted to the news. We can tune into 24 hours news bulletins in at any time to see news of events around the world and can also be avid readers of the daily newspapers. Have you noticed that the vast majority of news items are bad news. Every day we are told of violent deaths, disasters, terrorism and economic troubles. Is it any wonder that many people suffer from depression?

I remember one man saying that he always turned to the back pages of the newspaper first, not so much because he was a sports fan, but because the back pages told him about human achievements rather than human failures. Sometimes, to alleviate the barrage of bad news items, news broadcasts finish with a small positive story, which is often humorous.

In daily life we often have to cope with bad news. Losing our job, being diagnosed with a serious illness or the death of someone we love will cause us considerable stress. As we grow older, bad news tends to become more frequent. We all have a great need for some really good news.

The message about Jesus Christ is good news. When Jesus was born the angels announced “good news of great joy.” At the beginning of his public ministry he proclaimed the good news of God’s Kingdom, calling people to turn from their sinful lives and to trust in him. This emphasis on our sinfulness is often seen to be negative, but much of the bad news we hear is related to people who have done bad things. Jesus said that we all need to change, whether we are religious or not.

It is a wonderful thing to know that a new beginning is possible. Sinful actions may offer a temporary happiness but, eventually, only bring us grief. Through Jesus Christ our sins, however many they are and, however serious they may be, can all be forgiven. Last week I watched a DVD of a church service in Moldova. The man leading the service and the 4 men leading the singing had all been members of the mafia but have now become Christians. Their lives have been transformed. They have given up their lives of crime and are now telling people about Jesus. Their lives have a new direction and new meaning and they want others to know Jesus too. Now that’s a really good news story which offers hope to us all.