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John Wesley’s Story

The 24th May 1738 was a very significant day in the life of John Wesley, the founder of Methodism in England. He became one of the greatest spiritual leaders in English history playing a key role in the 18th century revival of religion. John was the son of Samuel and Susanna Wesley. Of the 19 children Susanna bore, only 3 sons and 7 daughters survived. Samuel was the Rector of Epworth and Susanna was a strongminded mother who practised strict discipline with her children.

John and his brother Charles, the great hymnwriter, went to Oxford University, where they started a small group of students, nicknamed “the Holy Club”, which met for prayer and Bible study. The group stressed the need for both a deep inward faith and practical service to those in need. They visited the sick and those in prison. When he left Oxford in 1735, John accepted an invitation to go, with his brother Charles, as missionaries to the recently founded colony of Georgia.

During the voyage to America there was a terrifying storm and John was afraid he was going to die. He attended a service on board ship with a group of German Moravian Christians. During the service a huge wave engulfed the ship and water poured down into the cabins. The Moravians continued singing – men, women and children – seemingly unafraid. Later John asked one of the Moravians why they hadn’t been afraid. The man told him that because they knew God they were not afraid to die. John realised that they had something he didn’t have. They were able to face death because they knew that God was never going to let them go.

After returning from Georgia, John attended a meeting of Moravian Christians in Aldersgate Street on 24th May 1738. He was not keen to go but at that meeting he had a profound spiritual experience. John described what happened to him, “About a quarter before nine, while the man was describing the change which God works in the heart through faith in Christ, I felt my heart strangely warmed. I felt I did trust Christ, Christ alone for salvation, and an assurance was given me that he had taken away my sins, even mine, and saved me from the law of sin and death.” John was no longer afraid of dying. Between 1738 and his death in 1791 he travelled more than 250,000 miles and preached more than 40,000 sermons proclaiming to many people the same message by which he had come to know God and England was transformed.

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Thought

Remembering Lieutenant William Noel Hodgson

The Battle of the Somme began on 1 July 1916. The British generals were confident of success as they sent 100,000 men over the top to attack the German positions. But on the first day the British army suffered 57,470 casualties, including 19,240 killed. The Battle of the Somme lasted 5 months and more than a million soldiers from the British, German and French armies were wounded or killed.

One of the young men in the trenches was 23 years old Lieutenant William Noel Hodgson. He had graduated from Oxford University with first class honours and was a fine athlete. His father was the Bishop of Saint Edmundsbury and Ipswich. William was known as “Smiler” to his friends. When war broke out he volunteered for the British Army. He had already fought in the Battle of Loos and had been awarded the Military Cross for his bravery. He was killed in action at Mametz by a single bullet to the neck on 1 July 1916.

He wrote a poem, entitled “Before Action”, which was published two days before he died. It gives a powerful and deeply moving insight into the hearts of the men in the trenches.

“By all the glories of the day and the cool evening’s benison. By that last sunset touch that lay upon the hills when day was done. By beauty lavishly outpoured and blessings carelessly received. By all the days that I have lived, make me a soldier, Lord.

By all of all man’s hopes and fears and all the wonders poets sing. The laughter of unclouded years, and every sad and lovely thing; By the romantic ages stored with high endeavour that was his. By all his mad catastrophes, make me a man, O Lord.

I, that on my familiar hill saw with uncomprehending eyes a hundred of thy sunsets spill their fresh and sanguine sacrifice, ere the sun swings his noonday sword, must say good-bye to all of this. By all delights that I shall miss, help me to die, O Lord.”

Like William Hodgson, many men in the trenches in the Somme must have prayed to God for help as they faced imminent death. God always hears such prayers and, in Jesus, speaks comfort to our hearts. “Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me … and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord forever.”