Everybody’s got a past

The Internet has changed our lives both positively and negatively. One negative factor is the ease with which pornography can be accessed by both adults and children. Many men and women regularly view pornography online and some are addicted. Pornography corrupts our minds and can wreck marriages and relationships. There is a growing concern about its influence on children and young people and the long-term effects on their lives.

The story of Crystal Bassette shows how God can change our lives and set us free from the things of which we are ashamed. Crystal is married to David and is a mother of 3 children. She lives in upstate New York where she and David lead New Beginnings Christian Life Church. Until 2014 Crystal’s life was very different. She suffered abuse as a child and had her first child when she was 16. In order to earn money, she started working in the sex industry and starred in many pornographic films. She earned a lot of money, owned a luxury house in Malibu in California and drove a Ferrari; but she wasn’t happy.

From the very beginning she had been uneasy with what she was doing. “The first shoot was horrible,” she said. “I was scared and afterwards, I sat in a shower, and I was bawling my eyes out crying for, like, two hours. I just felt so gross and just dirty, but I went back for money.” Then in 2014, Crystal was driving home drunk and had a serious car accident. Her car was a write-off and she had a broken nose and cuts to her face. This was a wake-up call for her.

Crystal began going to church with her sister and decided to leave the porn industry for good. As she read the Bible she realized that through Jesus Christ she could find forgiveness and a new life. As she put her trust in Jesus as her Saviour, she knew that God had forgiven all her sins. She and David are now committed to reaching out to people who are broken and lost, and telling them the good news about Jesus. Crystal says, “There’s a big heroin addiction in our city, we want to get people out of porn or dancing, I believe money is the root of all evil. With us there is no judgment on people; people feel free. It doesn’t matter if you came through the doors with full body piercings and tattoos and stuff. We don’t judge you. Everybody’s got a past.”

The wonderful offer of forgiveness

Today well-known public figures are subject to scrutiny as never before. Those who stand for major offices of State, for example to be President of the USA, can expect details of their private life to be made public and to be critically assessed. The reason for this is to see if their public persona and private life match. What they have said or done in the past is seen as a reliable indicator of the kind of people they really are.

It is not only public personalities who experience inconsistencies in their private lives. All of us are familiar with the struggle to live a private life that is consistent with our public image. When we are away from the public gaze it is only too easy to drop our guard and to do and say things we would not do if people were watching us. The fact that we don’t want people to know the wrong things we have done in private is a sign that we are ashamed of them.

In God’s sight there is no distinction between our public and private lives. Our whole life is seen and known by him. “Nothing in all creation is hidden from God. Everything is naked and exposed before his eyes, and he is the one to whom we are accountable.” Jesus said, “For everything that is hidden will eventually be brought into the open, and every secret will be brought to light.”

Religion can sometimes be a cloak for hypocrisy. Some people who take a strong public stand for righteousness do not live according to the standards they lay down for others. Cult leaders, with many followers, have sometimes been exposed as men who have used their power to satisfy their sexual desires and greed for money. Jesus spoke against the hypocrisy of the religious leaders of his day who performed good deeds “to be admired by others.”

None of us can stand in the face of God’s scrutiny but, in Jesus, there is the promise of his grace and forgiveness. In Psalm 130 the psalmist says to God, “Lord, if you kept a record of our sins, who, O Lord, could ever survive? But you offer forgiveness, that we might learn to fear you.” It is a wonderful thing when we experience God’s undeserved love and grace and know that there is no longer any need to pretend because we have confessed everything to him and he will never count our sins against us.

Remember your Creator

For many weeks the main item on almost every news programme has been the economic crisis in Europe. The struggles of Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Spain and Italy have been analysed in great detail. These countries, and the UK, have massive debts as a result of government over-spending and these debts threaten the economic stability of the whole Euro zone. The solution is a combination of high interest loans and austerity measures which will impact many people. Millions of people, including many young people, have no job and most of us will have to tighten their belts.

In Europe we live in a consumer society. Consumerism is based on the systematic creation and fostering of a desire to purchase goods and services in ever greater amounts. We are encouraged to buy things we don’t really need with money we haven’t got. This is in contrast to the millions of people around in the world who survive on a dollar a day. For them life is about survival. They have no extras and are grateful if they have one meal of rice a day. The child mortality rate is high and life expectancy low.

In the Western world consumerism has developed over the past 60 years as we have enjoyed an increasing standard of living. We judge ourselves and others in terms of how much money we have and the designer goods we own. The mantra of consumerism is “I shop, therefore I am!” The range of goods available in our supermarkets is an attempt to meet the growing demands of consumers for greater choice. But now we are being brought back to reality and the impact on our societies will be great.

Solomon was a great king who was renowned for his wisdom and his wealth. He wrote the book of Ecclesiastes, which is in the Bible, and reflected on the meaning of life if we live simply for money or pleasure. He recognised the ultimate meaninglessness of life if we live for material things and forget the living God. His book is a tract for our times. He wrote, “Whoever loves money never has enough; whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with his income. Naked a man comes from his mother’s womb, and as he comes, so he departs. Remember your Creator in the days of your youth, before the days of trouble come and the years approach when you will say, I find no pleasure in them.”

The Death of a Dictator

Muammar Gaddafi is dead. After 8 months of civil war he was captured and killed by former rebel forces in Sirte, his home town. He had ruled Libya for 42 years and was responsible for many atrocities both within Libya and in other countries. He was one of the richest men in the world with a personal fortune estimated at more the £100 billion. His children, some of whom have also died, were also billionaires. The graphic images of his last moments, and of his dead body, have been broadcast around the world. He died at the hands of some of the people whom his regime had so badly mistreated.

Power and money are very powerful influences in our lives. Until this year Gaddafi ruled supreme in Libya. No-one dared to oppose him because those who did were imprisoned, tortured and killed. His power enabled him to accumulate his vast fortune. Power can have an intoxicating effect when everyone obeys our commands and we can buy everything we want. It seems that even in his last moments he tried, unsuccessfully, to buy his freedom. He may have been killed with his own silver revolver.

Many people today do not believe in God or eternity. Their philosophy is “when you’re dead, you’re dead.” If this is true then Colonel Gaddafi’s life was a success. For 42 years he reigned supreme and enjoyed every pleasure this world offers. His power and money, and the fact that Libya has vast oil reserves, ensured that, until this year, the international community never really held him to account. His last few months were difficult, and his last few minutes terrifying, but now he is dead and will never face divine judgement. Can this really be true?

The Bible teaches that we are all accountable to God. The apostle Paul wrote, “We must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, that each one may receive what is due to him for the things done while in the body, whether good or bad.” This ultimate reality is the essential foundation of morality. We are all accountable for the things we do and will be judged by God. We need to take this seriously. The wonderful message of the Gospel is that “God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him, whoever believes in him is not condemned.”