When we lose everything

What do you do when you lose everything? Pictures of the devastation wrought by Hurricane Irma on islands in the Caribbean, such as Barbuda and the British Virgin Islands, are heart-breaking. People have lost their homes and all their possessions. They were helpless in the face of the power of the hurricane. When reporters talked to them you could see the shock and bewilderment on their faces as they looked at the ruins of what was once their home. Re-establishing normal life again is a daunting task. Some, however, said that, although they have lost everything, they are thankful to God that they and their loved ones are alive.

In America people have been remembering the events of the 9th September 2001, when the attacks on the Twin Towers of the World Trade Centre in New York killed 2,997 people and injured more than 6000 others. The total collapse of the towers stunned all who witnessed it and those around the world who saw the pictures. Hearing the stories of those who lost loved ones in the attacks brings home their sense of absolute helplessness as, in the minutes after the attacks, they spoke on the telephone to relatives who were trapped in the towers with no possibility of escape. All they could do was tell each other “I love you” and pray.

The Bible tells the story of a man called Job. He was a blameless and upright man who feared God. He had seven sons and three daughters, and owned thousands of sheep, camels, oxen and donkeys. He also had many servants. On the same day, all his animals were stolen or killed by lightning and all his sons and daughters died as the house in which they were enjoying a meal together was struck by a tornado and collapsed. He lost everything. When the news of these devastating events came to Job, he tore his robe and shaved his head and fell to the ground in worship saying, “Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked I will depart. The Lord gave and the Lord has taken away; may the name of the Lord be praised.”

Devastating loss is not a sign of God’s displeasure or an indication that those who experience it are worse people than others. We can pray for those who are seeking to rebuild their lives that God will give them the strength they need and also that he will make us truly thankful for all the blessings he has graciously given us.

Remembering the Great Fire of London

At midnight on 2 September 1666 a fire began that razed the medieval heart of London to the ground. Over the next four days, assisted by official blunders, a minor accident turned into a major conflagration in which many people lost their homes, their livelihoods and, in some cases, their lives. The previous year Bubonic Plague, the Black Death, had killed tens of thousands of people in London.

The Great Fire of London started in the King’s bakery in Pudding Lane, near London Bridge. The summer had been very hot and the wooden houses in the narrow streets were very dry. The Lord Mayor underestimated the seriousness of the fire and failed to give the order to pull houses down to prevent the fire from spreading. By the time King Charles II gave the order to pull houses down it was too late to stop the fire spreading. By 4 September half of London was in flames. St Paul’s Cathedral was destroyed.

By the time the fire was brought under control only one fifth of London was left standing. Most civic buildings were destroyed and 13,000 homes, but amazingly the official figure was that only 6 people had died. Hundreds of thousands of people were left homeless; 89 parish churches, the Guildhall, jails and markets had become burnt-out shells. The loss of property was estimated at between £5 and £7 million. However, although the Great Fire was a catastrophe, overcrowded and disease ridden streets were destroyed and a new London emerged. Sir Christopher Wren was given the task of re-building the city and the new St. Paul’s Cathedral was completed in 1711.

It is not easy to understand why some things in this life happen. When we pass through dark times, however, it is good to bring our sadness to God and to trust him to give us strength in the present and hope for the future. The Bible tells the story of a man called Job. He was a man of complete integrity who feared God and stayed away from evil. Yet, in a mysterious way, through a series of disasters, he suffered the loss of everything he had, including his 10 children. When he heard his children had died, Job was heart-broken. He fell to the ground in worship and said, “I came naked from my mother’s womb, and I will be naked when I leave. The Lord gave me what I had, and the Lord has taken it away. Praise the name of the Lord!”

The earth is the Lord’s

In 2007 the BBC reported that a scientist in the USA, Professor Wieslaw Maslowski, had forecast that by the summer of 2013 the Arctic would be ice-free. Other scientists agreed with this forecast, which was based on super-computer models. This summer 20 yachts tried to sail the Northwest Passage, which links the Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. All these vessels are presently stuck in the ice because the Northwest Passage has remained ice-bound and impassable all summer. The Arctic ice sheet has grown this summer by a million square miles, an increase of 60% on last year.

In the Bible we read of the sufferings of Job. He was a good man who experienced great personal tragedy in his life. The book of Job records his struggle to understand why these things had happened to him. His so-called “comforters” told him his sufferings were God’s punishment on his sins. Then God appears to Job and answers his questions by asking him questions. “Where were you when I laid the earth’s foundation? Tell me if you understand. Who marked off its dimensions? Surely you know! Who stretched a measuring line across it? On what were its footings set, or who laid its cornerstone – while the morning stars sang together and all the angels shouted for joy?”

Then God highlights all the amazing features of the heavens and earth which he has created, including ice. He asks Job, “From whose womb comes the ice? Who gives birth to the frost from the heavens when the waters become hard as stone, when the surface of the deep is frozen?” Job’s humble response to all God says is, “Surely I spoke of things I did not understand, things too wonderful for me to know. My ears had heard of you but now my eyes see you. Therefore I despise myself and repent in dust and ashes.”

This wonderful universe was created by God and he continues to uphold it in his perfect wisdom. Despite everything people do which is environmentally damaging God’s creation remains amazingly stable. The understanding of the greatest of men is very small and partial. Early modern scientists, encouraged by their faith in God, were conscious of “thinking God’s thoughts after him.” Like Job, we, too, need to find God in the perplexing experiences of our lives. He is gracious and compassionate and very kind. Sometimes out of the pain and struggles of life we come to know God’s presence and comfort in a new way.