The power of forgiveness

When the Allied forces surrendered Singapore to the Japanese in 1942, Tony Lucas, who died recently, was one of 80,000 troops who became prisoners of war. For the next three and a half years he, along with many others, were slave labourers on the construction of the Burma-Thailand railway. Tony was one of 17,000 PoWs packed into Selarang barracks, which was designed to take 800, with all water supplies, barring one tap, disconnected to compel them to sign a pledge not to escape.

Tony was transported by rail to Thailand. Thirty prisoners were locked into each airless steel-roofed truck, in toxic heat. The journey lasted five days. Lucas thought he would die; several did. In Thailand, hacking out the 258-mile railway line, reveille was at 4.30am, followed by a three-mile march through the jungle to the area the Australians named “Hellfire Pass”. Men worked in pairs, alternately swinging a 7lb hammer and holding a 3ft iron bar. They never returned before 10.30pm.

He and the other prisoners survived on a daily ration of a cupful of degraded rice. Tony suffered dysentery, malaria and jungle ulcers; his weight dropped from 11-stone to 6. On his twenty-first bout of malaria, an Allied doctor gave him a massive dose of paludrine. After that he remained free from malaria, but contracted cholera whilst helping carry corpses out for burning. On one occasion a guard, who was nicknamed “The Undertaker” because he had killed prisoners with an iron bar, attacked Tony and knocked out 3 of his teeth.

After the war, Tony suffered nightmares and terrible bouts of depression. Understandably, he at first despised the Japanese. However, as he understood more he realised that it was the military in Japan and not the wider civilian population who were responsible for the atrocities. Later, in his work with an associate company of ICI, he visited Japan on business and showed a remarkable capacity to forgive the extreme suffering he experienced. A forgiving spirit is much more powerful than a spirit of hate and vengeance.

Tony was a private person who had a very deep Christian faith. His father was an Anglican clergyman and, from childhood, Tony had been taught about Jesus and his great love for a sinful world. Tony often prayed the Lord’s Prayer including the words “Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.” He also knew that when he was dying on the Cross, Jesus prayed, “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.”

The Lord God omnipotent reigns!

Following their latest test of an intercontinental ballistic missile, there is growing concern around the world about North Korea. Kim Jong-un, the North Korean leader, claims that the entire US is now within striking range of his missiles. The North Koreans are also working on a project to miniaturise a nuclear warhead to fit on their long-range missiles. The leaders of South Korea, Japan and the USA are not sure how to respond. China is a key player in influencing Kim Jong-un, but is reluctant to act.

Throughout history there have been leaders who have been ambitious to extend and display their power. The Bible tells the story of King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon that was the world super-power of that day. One night Nebuchadnezzar had a dream that deeply disturbed him. He saw a large tree in the middle of the earth that reached high into the heavens for all the world to see. Then a messenger shouted, “Cut down the tree and lop off its branches! But leave the stump and the roots in the ground, bound with a band of iron and bronze. Let him be drenched with the dew of heaven, and let him live with the wild animals among the plants of the field. Let him have the mind of a wild animal instead of the mind of a man.”

King Nebuchadnezzar asked Daniel to interpret his dream. He told Nebuchadnezzar that the tree represented him. Nebuchadnezzar had grown strong and great; his rule reached up to heaven and to the ends of the earth. Through the dream, God was telling Nebuchadnezzar that he would be driven from human society and would live in the fields with the wild animals until he learned “that the Most High rules over the kingdoms of the world and gives them to anyone he chooses.” Nebuchadnezzar would receive his kingdom back when he learned that heaven rules. Then Daniel gave the King some advice, “Stop sinning and do what is right. Break from your wicked past and be merciful to the poor.”

The dream God gave Nebuchadnezzar came to pass. After his sanity returned he praised and worshipped God and said, “Now I, Nebuchadnezzar, praise and glorify and honour the King of heaven. All his acts are just and true, and he is able to humble the proud.” Today the leaders of the nations, and those who aspire to great power, should humbly remember that heaven rules. All of us can also find great comfort in knowing that the Lord God omnipotent reigns!

The Forgotten Army

It was a very moving occasion when the veterans of the war in the Far East paraded through central London to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Japanese surrender that finally brought World War II to an end. These men and women were known as “The Forgotten Army” because their war ended three months after the victory in Europe. Some of them had experienced the appalling cruelty of the Japanese prisoner of war camps; others had worked on the infamous Burma-Siam “Death Railway.”

Thousands of people lined the route from Horse Guards Parade to Westminster Abbey to cheer the veterans, some being pushed in wheel chairs by family members. There was real sadness in remembering those who died so long ago, but also great joy that so many people had joined them to remember what happened and to affirm their love and appreciation for all the veterans and their comrades had suffered to secure victory in the Far East. In Japan, Emperor Akihito expressed “deep remorse” for his country’s wartime actions and the earnest hope “that the ravages of war will never be repeated.”

The war in the Far East left deep mental scars on many who survived. One of my aunts, who died a few years ago, was a member of the Burma Star Association. As a young woman she served in the Far East with the Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps. She found it very difficult to forget the things she had witnessed when she saw many young soldiers being killed or terribly wounded, both physically and emotionally. The horrors of war remained with her for the rest of her life.

To whom can we turn for comfort when we, or those who we love, suffer through great human evil and wickedness? As we bring our pain and questions to God he will give us his peace. In Psalm 27 David, who fought many battles against fierce enemies, writes, “The Lord is my light and my salvation – whom shall I fear? The Lord is the stronghold of my life – of whom shall I be afraid? When the wicked advance against me to devour me, it is my enemies and my foes who will stumble and fall. Though an army besiege me, my heart will not fear; though war break out against me, even then I will be confident. For in the day of trouble he will keep me safe in his dwelling; he will hide me in the shelter of his sacred tent and set me high upon a rock.”

Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki

On 6 August 1945 the United States Air Force dropped an atomic bomb on the city of Hiroshima in Japan. It was the first atomic bomb ever to be used. It killed 70,000 people immediately and destroyed 63% of all buildings in the city. In the months that followed another 70,000 people died from their injuries and the effects of radiation. On 9 August an even more powerful bomb was dropped on Nagasaki killing at least 70,000 people. The overwhelming majority of those who died were ordinary Japanese people. This is the only time nuclear weapons have ever been used in warfare. On 15 August Japan surrendered to the Allies. President Truman and Winston Churchill justified the use of atomic weapons because it shortened the war and saved far more lives than were lost.

Group Captain Leonard Cheshire was one of the most distinguished airman of World War II. In 1944 he was awarded the Victoria Cross. He was a British observer on board an American plane when the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki. He was deeply affected by what he witnessed in the destruction of Nagasaki and resigned from the RAF. In 1948 he established The Leonard Cheshire Homes which provided care for disabled ex-servicemen to encourage and enable them towards independent living and the freedom to live life as they wished.

Today there are far more nuclear weapons in the world. 9 countries are known to possess nuclear weapons and several others are in the process of developing them. For the first time in history it is possible for all human life on earth to be destroyed. This is a terrifying prospect, especially because some nations and terrorist groups have hostile intentions towards their enemies and the Western world in general. Some people feel it is only a matter of time before nuclear weapons are used again with even more devastating consequences.

Jesus spoke about the course of world history. He said there would be continuing wars and conflicts, “Nation will go to war against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. There will be great earthquakes, and there will be famines and plagues in many lands, and there will be terrifying things and great miraculous signs from heaven.” He also taught that God is in control of world history and that, whatever happens, hope is held out to all people in him, “The Good News about the Kingdom will be preached throughout the whole world, so that all nations will hear it; and then the end will come.”

VE Day Remembered

This week is the 70th anniversary of VE Day when, on 8 May 1945, Nazi Germany unconditionally surrendered to the Allies. As World War II in Europe came to an end celebrations erupted from Moscow to Los Angeles. In Britain more than one million people celebrated on the streets of London. King George VI and the Queen, accompanied by Winston Churchill, appeared on the balcony of Buckingham Palace. Princess Elizabeth and Princess Margaret were allowed to join the celebrating crowds incognito.

It is no wonder there were great celebrations. The dark years of World War II, the deadliest conflict in history, were over in Europe, and 3 months later the war in the Pacific also ended. During the War the Allies lost 61 million people, of whom 45 million were civilians. The Axis countries lost 12 million people, including 4 million civilians. Many millions of people were also injured.

The history of the world reveals the constant reality of evil and wickedness. In every generation wicked people kill and maim men, women and children in pursuit of their own evil ambitions. Every day we hear reports of the wars and conflicts in our world today. Will it ever come to an end?

The Bible answers this question and provides a coherent view of history. The universe didn’t come into existence by chance, but by the creative act of God. He created the heavens and the earth. Everything he created, including men and women, was good. In early history, however, sin entered the world as the first man, Adam, disobeyed the command of God. From that time on sin and evil have always been with us and stem from our rebellion against our Creator. The course of human history reveals the tragic consequences of this rebellion.

In his Son, Jesus, God decisively intervened in the history of the world to bring hope to the nations. By his death on the cross Jesus defeated death and the devil and brought a new age of hope for the peoples of the world. He sent his disciples into all the world to preach a message of good news and hope to all. As they have received Jesus as their Saviour, people from all nations have found peace with God and hope for the future. One day the Kingdom of God will be consummated and “the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of God as the waters cover the sea.” What a celebration there will be when that day comes!