I am with you always

The Remembrance Services this year have been deeply moving as we have remembered the millions of people who died in the World Wars of the 20th century, and especially in the Great War of 1914-1918. The casualty statistics are hard to take in. In the Great War 65 million men were mobilised across Europe: more than 8 million soldiers and 7 million civilians died and 21 million were wounded. Many soldiers from countries in the Commonwealth, including India, Australia and New Zealand, Canada, Africa and the West Indies also died. In the Battle of the Somme, 1 July to 18 November 2016, 1 million people on all sides were killed. British forces suffered 57,000 casualties on the first day, of whom more than 19000 were killed.

Theo Chadburn, a miner from Sheffield, was a member of the Salvation Army and played in the band. He served at Ypres and, 3 days before he died, wrote a letter to his wife Lily in which he said, “I believe that every day I learn more of his goodness.” He told her that on Easter Day 1918 he saw 150 soldiers go forward to receive Jesus Christ as their Saviour and said, “It was the best Easter Sunday night meeting I have ever spent. I was greatly blessed.”

Albert Penn came from Hasland, near Chesterfield. He was married to Florence who was expecting their first child. They met at the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in the village where Albert led the boys’ Bible class and Florence led the girls’ class. They were enjoying their first home and looking forward to the sharing the rest of their lives together. But the war changed all that. In 1916 Albert volunteered and was told to come back when their baby, Mary Estelle, was 3 months old. He did and was killed on 30 October 1917 at Passchendaele when Mary was just 11 months old. He was 28 years old and his body was never found.

A wounded solider, who had been a member of Albert’s Bible class at home, told the family that he had seen Albert standing in an open field with a Bible in his hand talking to the young soldiers and then leading them in singing the hymn “Rejoice the Lord is King!” Five days later Albert and his regiment went over the top and he died. His granddaughter said, “I know that, in that terrible time, it wasn’t so much that he kept his faith in God, but that the God in whom he trusted kept him.”

Remembering Christabel Pankhurst

This year we are celebrating the centenary of the Representation of the People Act 2018 which, for the first time, granted some women in Britain the right to vote. One of the women who campaigned to win the right for women to be allowed to vote was Christabel Pankhurst, Emmeline Pankhurst’s eldest daughter. Christabel was a leader, alongside her mother, in the Women’s Social and Political Union and was the first suffragette to spend a night in prison. In 1905 she and another woman assaulted a police officer and were both arrested. This was the beginning of a decade of civil disobedience directed against the Liberal Prime Minister Herbert Asquith who delayed a vote on suffrage for women despite there being growing support for it in the House of Commons.

Christabel took advantage of the opportunity for women to study law and, in 1906, gained a first-class honours degree in law from Victoria University, Manchester. In 1908 she was brought to trial for her WSPU activities and defended herself. She issued a court summons to Lloyd George, who was then the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and cross-examined him personally. By 1912 the government had decided to crush the women’s movement and imprison the leadership. Christabel fled to France and from there she continued to lead the WSPU.

In 1918 Christabel read a book on biblical prophecy and came to personal faith in Jesus Christ. The terrible traumas caused by the First World War had made her, and many others, seriously concerned about the future of the world. Through her reading of the Bible, Christabel became convinced that the second coming of Jesus Christ was the only hope for this troubled world.

In 1923 she moved to Toronto to join her mother and became a popular speaker at Christian events in both North America and the UK. She wrote a regular column in The Christian newspaper and wrote several books. In 1936 she was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. When the local paper reported her death in 1958 it described her as “Dame Christabel Pankhurst, militant campaigner for Christ and women’s suffrage.”

Christabel Pankhurst was a passionate lady. At great personal cost, she campaigned passionately for the rights of women in Britain who were being very badly treated. She was passionate about the future wellbeing of the people of this world. She was passionate in her faith in Jesus Christ and tirelessly proclaimed him to others. And, so, even though she is dead, her life still speaks today.

“God’s Tenor”

Jon Vickers has died at the age of 88. He was a world famous tenor singer whose rich and powerful voice was once described as “holding a hundred colours and inflections.” He was given the nickname “God’s tenor” because of the outstanding quality of his voice and his Christian faith. He was the finest Heldentenor of his day and sang the great heroic tenor roles in German opera. He was a perfectionist and was not always easy to work with. At times he made controversial decisions because of his Christian convictions.

Jon was born in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, the sixth of eight children. His family was musical but very poor. His parents were so poor that the future Canadian Prime Minister, John Diefenbaker, who was a long-standing friend of the family, offered to care for young Jon. As a child Jon and his brothers and sisters sang with his lay-preacher father at churches near their home. In the summer Jon worked on neighbouring farms where he developed his barrel chest. His success as a world famous tenor, and the honours and wealth that came with it, were in marked contrast with his humble beginnings. When he retired in 1988 he was very content on his farm, surrounded by nature and his family.

Jon’s Christian faith was the guiding principle for the whole of his life. He knew that the gifts he possessed had been given to him by God, so he wanted to use them in a way that pleased God. He knew that the most important thing was not his international success and acclaim but what he was as a man before God. After retiring he had time to return to his roots and to reflect on the things that matter most in life. He also had time to prepare for eternity. He proved with Paul that “godliness with contentment is great gain. For we brought nothing into the world, and we can take nothing out of it.”

Jon is now in heaven with his Saviour, and with all those from every nation who have experienced God’s love in Jesus. He has joined the heavenly choirs who joyfully worship God as they remember God’s amazing love and grace to them. To the most beautiful heavenly music they sing, “Salvation belongs to our God, who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb. Worthy is the Lamb, who was slain, to receive power and wealth and wisdom and strength and honour and glory and praise!”