All work and no play

The summer holidays have arrived and many families have already gone away for their annual break. Children are looking forward to 6 weeks when they don’t have to go to school and there is no homework. Hopefully the weather will be good and they will be able to relax, play with their friends and do things they enjoy doing. They, and their teachers, will return to school in September refreshed and ready to start a new academic year.

We all need a balance between work and rest. So it is very sad that there are plans to allow larger shops to open longer hours on Sundays. Local councils will be allowed to extend opening hours if this might “boost economic activity”. The chancellor thinks there is a “growing appetite” for shopping on a Sunday and feels that some people consider shopping to be one of their leisure activities. There are understandable concerns that if larger shops open longer hours this will put pressure on their employees to work extra hours and some smaller shops may close.

The Ten Commandments, which establish the moral basis for our lives, include a commandment about a weekly day of rest. “Remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy. Six days you shall labour and do all your work, but the seventh day is a sabbath to the Lord your God. On it you shall not do any work, neither you, nor your son or daughter, nor your male or female servant, nor your animals, nor any foreigner residing in your towns. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, but he rested on the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.”

All of us, whether we are religious or not, need and benefit from regular times of rest. The proverb “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy” is true. When we don’t have times of rest and recreation we do become bored and boring people. For Christians Sundays also have a special significance because they remind us about heaven and the wonderful blessings God has prepared for all who love him. At many funeral services these words from the Book of Revelation are read, “Then I heard a voice from heaven say, ‘Write this: Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from now on.’ ‘Yes,’ says the Spirit, ‘they will rest from their labour, for their deeds will follow them.’”

They will soar on wings like eagles

Ospreys were once common in Britain but in the early 20th century became totally extinct in these islands. Over the past 50 years they have been reintroduced, especially in Scotland and in the past 10 years Ospreys have begun breeding in Wales. Over the past few weeks my wife and I have been watching a live stream of an Osprey nest in the Dyfi estuary at www.dyfiopsreyproject.com/stream. It has been fascinating to watch the parents feeding their 3 chicks as they have grown to the point they are nearly ready to fly.

Ospreys are known as fish eagles or fish hawks since they live on fish that they catch by high diving to the water’s surface. They have large feet and curved claws to help them pluck fish from the water. Then they can carry their prey for great distances to their nests. Ospreys have a wingspan of up to 6 feet. In the autumn the adults migrate thousands of miles, often to Africa, returning in the spring.

Watching the Osprey nest we have been amazed at the wonder of God’s creation. The earth is full of countless examples of his creativity and beauty. The birds, animals, and fish, the flowers and trees, the mountains and valleys, the rivers and sea, the sun, moon and stars and glorious heavens all speak of the God who is there. The popular song “I Believe” expresses the longing of the human heart, “Every time I hear a newborn baby cry, or touch a leaf, or see the sky, then I know why, I believe. I believe above the storm the smallest prayer will still be heard. I believe that someone in the great somewhere hears every word.”

The Bible reveals God’s glory and steadfast love even more clearly. Many years ago God spoke wonderful words of comfort to his people in a time of great need and austerity. They are still true today. “Do you not know? Have you not heard? The Lord is the everlasting God, the Creator of the ends of the earth. He will not grow tired or weary, and his understanding no one can fathom. He gives strength to the weary and increases the power of the weak. Even youths grow tired and weary, and young men stumble and fall; but those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.”

The Battle of Britain remembered

This summer we are remembering the 75th anniversary of The Battle of Britain. It was a crucial air battle early in World War II. In June 1940 France surrendered to Germany and Hitler began to plan the invasion of Britain. In order to do this the Luftwaffe needed to establish air superiority in the south of England so that an invading German army would face little effective opposition as it crossed the English Channel. The Luftwaffe had more fighter planes and bombers. The RAF depended mainly on Hawker Hurricane and Spitfire fighter planes.

During the summer of 1940 the Luftwaffe first attacked shipping in the Channel and coastal towns in the south of England and then attacked airfields, such as Biggin Hill, and radar bases. The young pilots of the RAF were in constant action flying as many as 5 times a day to repel the waves of Luftwaffe attacks. The aim was to destroy the RAF and render Britain defenceless against invading forces. It is estimated that between 10 July and the end of October 1940 the RAF lost 1023 aircraft whilst the Luftwaffe lost 1887. The RAF won the Battle of Britain and Hitler postponed the invasion of Britain and turned instead to invading the Soviet Union.

On 21 August 1940 Winston Churchill made a famous speech in the House of Commons. “The gratitude of every home in our island, in our Empire, and indeed throughout the world, except in the abodes of the guilty, goes out to the British airmen who, undaunted by odds, unweakened by their constant challenge and mortal danger, are turning the tide of world war by their prowess and their devotion. Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.“

These words remind us of the deep gratitude and love which Christians feel towards Jesus. By his death on the Cross he won a great victory over sin and death and hell and secured freedom and salvation for all who look to him for help. Hymnist Robert Robinson wrote, “Jesus sought me when a stranger, wandering from the fold of God; he, to rescue me from danger, interposed his precious blood.” Since Jesus died and rose again millions of people from all nations on earth have experienced the amazing love and grace of God and have found true and lasting peace in Jesus. Never in the history of the world have so many owed so much to one man.

The man who saved 669 children

Sir Nicholas Winton has died at the age of 106. About 6000 people in the world today owe their lives to Nicholas. He was a stockbroker who became aware of the plight of Jewish families when he was on holiday in Prague at Christmas 1938. In the months leading up to the outbreak of World War II he organised the rescue of 669 Jewish children from German-occupied Czechoslovakia through an operation known as Kindertransport. He found homes for the children and arranged safe passage for them to Britain. The last group, which left Prague on 3 September 1939, was sent back because the Nazis had invaded Poland. Many of the parents perished in Auschwitz.

Nicholas kept the wonderful things he did, in saving so many Jewish children, secret for more than 40 years until in 1988 his wife, Greta, found a detailed scrapbook in the attic. In 2002, at the age of 93, he received a Knighthood for this work.

Nicholas illustrates the amazing contrasts there are in the actions of human beings. Seeing the growing power of the Nazis in Europe, which led to the death of millions of Jewish people, he took action to save lives. He said, “If something is not impossible, then there must be a way to do it.” The death of millions of Jewish people in Nazi concentration camps was one of the greatest acts of evil in the history of the world. It is a warning to us all of the frightening capacity of the human heart for evil. The courageous act of one man in saving so many lives also shows us the amazing capacity of human beings for goodness and kindness.

The reticence of Nicholas to tell people what he did is remarkable. Jesus spoke of the great day when we will all stand before God in judgement. The King will say to those on his right, “Come, you who are blessed by my Father; take your inheritance. For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me. I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me.” When the righteous say they can’t remember doing these things for him, the King will reply, “I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these my brothers, you did for me.”