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Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red

The “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red” display at the Tower of London has caught the public imagination. More than 4 million people have visited the display which marks the centenary of Britain’s involvement in World War I. From 5 August to 11 November the moat of the Tower of London has been progressively filled with 888,246 ceramic poppies. Each poppy represents one of the British and Colonial soldiers, sailors and airmen who died in the Great War. The scale of the display visibly and powerfully commemorates the massive loss of life which happened 100 years ago. More than 16 million people, military and civilians, died and 20 million were wounded.

When war broke out the British Army desperately needed to recruit more soldiers because the German Army was five times larger. Among those who volunteered were 250,000 boys and young men under the age of 19, the legal limit for armed service overseas. Most of them had little idea of what they would face. It is estimated that half of those who fought on the front line were wounded, died or taken prisoner.

Our commemoration of the centenary of World War I coincides with the withdrawal of British service personnel from Afghanistan. The conflict in Afghanistan has vividly reminded us of the great human cost of war. Many young men and women have died. Many others have suffered life-changing injuries. Many families have lost sons and daughters, husbands and wives and brothers and sisters. Long after the Union Flag was lowered at Camp Bastion injured soldiers will struggle to cope with the rest of their lives and families will grieve the loss of deeply loved family members. There will be official help and support for a time, but the sense of pain and loss is deep and profound.

The message of the Gospel speaks to our deepest heart needs. Jesus was a young man who dedicated his life to seeking the eternal happiness of others. As God’s eternal Son he was entitled to enjoy all the privileges which were rightfully his, but he voluntarily came into this broken world “not to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.” His death and resurrection stand as a beacon of hope to people of all nations. He understands our deepest pain and loss because he has personally experienced profound pain and loss, and in great love and compassion he comes alongside us in our darkest times to give us comfort, strength and hope.

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